FAQ

You have questions— we have answers! If your question isn't answered below, please reach out. We'll be happy to chat.  hello@thebinaschool.com

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What technology do I need to participate in the course?


• A computer or tablet with camera & audio capabilities • Firefox or Chrome browser • A printer • A strong internet connection, minimum upload/download speed 1Mbps/1Mbps, recommended at least 4Mbps/4Mbps • A natural curiosity and interest in learning




How do I enroll my child?


For our short modules, we invite families to a short video call. We want to make sure the course is suited to their needs. For our September cohort we will publish information shortly. To enroll in courses, click here




How much will it cost?


The current price of modules is €225 per student per week. This covers 3 hours a day of expertly-crafted, highly-tailored lessons by experienced teachers, as well as unlimited access to the best educational software, and the direct support of developmental psychologists to ensure your student gets the most out of their bina education.




What subjects will my child study?


Our short modules focus on literacy and STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics). From September, our course of study will integrate literacy, language, arts, math, science, and history. Although our current modules are fully in English, our objective is to ultimately offer immersive language courses (70% English, 30% Language of your choice starting with French & German).




What is the family's role?


While your student is participating in a bina lesson, a parent or guardian must be in the vicinity at all times, but is not responsible for guiding learning (leave that to us!). In certain cases, we absolutely encourage parents or guardians to participate in select bina activities as well as support and assist where necessary.




What are bina's education standards?


The education experts at bina have developed a comprehensive program that is designed to not only fulfill but exceed US and British education standards. Our goal is to provide children with a broad education that is comparable or superior to that provided by their nation's best schools, regardless of demographic constraints.




Is bina accredited?


Bina is pursuing accreditation by national and international organizations.




Will my child be sitting in front of a computer all day?


Not at all. While the learning is guided by a teacher through a digital interface, substantial amounts of the exercises are highly interactive and are student-led.The students are also given hands-on, offline projects to work on: reading books, solving math problems on paper, drawing, and discovery-driving science experiments.




How can I connect with other families whose children are enrolled in bina?


Providing you give us authorization, we will connect all the families that are a part of our global community. Our objective in the future is to facilitate social, cultural and outdoor activities for families based in the same area.




Does bina provide textbooks and other instructional materials?


Yes, we provide all the textbooks and instructional materials that are needed to complete the program; these are included in course fees.




What computer skills are required?


Some basic skills are required, as use of the computer or tablet is an integral part of the program. However, naturally we’re here to help with technical support when needed.




How do students interact socially?


With online discussions and forums, new types of colourful international communities can be formed which simply couldn’t have geographically existed before. Students can also join a wide variety of clubs—some student-led, some headed by teachers— covering myriad topics and interests! Once the bina community grows roots and we identify clusters of students in certain geographical regions, we’ll focus on fostering regular in-person experiences from field trips and museum visits to picnics and social events.




My child is not five at the start of the course, can they still attend?


For this module, we can only accept children that can concentrate for at least 15 minutes at a time and participate productively in group exercises. Do you have younger kids who love telling stories? Hurray! Reach out to us; we’re interested in setting up an interactive group just for them.




What are the expectations for student behavior?


Kids learn best while having fun, and we want this to be an inspiring, respectful learning environment. Engaging little ones with wandering attention spans is part of our job, but at this early stage, we may need your support.
We encourage you to talk to your kids in advance about their responsibilities. Since we all want to enjoy our time together, in the case of challenging behavior, teachers will first let the child know that their behavior is inappropriate, and if the problem persists, we will reach out to you as the parent or guardian to discuss strategies to work together on this.




Will I get to see what my kids are doing?


We will provide regular feedback and you are very welcome to listen in on the live lessons (providing that it causes no interruptions to the teacher or other students).




How do you select teachers?


Our teachers are experts in elementary education, each with at least five years of hands-on experience in the classroom, with many closer to 10-15 years’ experience. We hand-select them for their excellent communication skills, a real passion for their subject, and their ability to adapt to our distance learning needs.




How is online teaching different from traditional classroom teaching?


The bina model emphasizes an interactive but rigorous learning environment, designed to stimulate active dialogue not only between the instructor and students, but also between students themselves. The instructor will often act as a facilitator, organizing activities that engage students directly rather than relying heavily on more traditional techniques like one-sided lectures and memorization.
Online learning is catalyzing a pedagogical shift in how we teach and learn. We’re at the birth of an educational revolution in which top-down lecturing to passive students is giving way to a more interactive, collaborative approach in which students and instructors work together to co-create the learning process. The instructor’s role is changing from the “sage on the stage” to “the guide on the side”, and that’s just how we like it!




What is an online asynchronous learning?


Some bina lessons are conducted asynchronously. Online courses are delivered to students who can then learn on their own schedule (self-paced learning) without requiring the instructor and students to be online at the same time. The course content (lessons, pre-recorded video lectures and tutorials, tests and quizzes, homework and assignments) can be accessed by all students enrolled in the course at any time, as long as the course is active and available.




What is an online synchronous (live) learning?


Live online classes are synchronous events organized in a live virtual meeting room where students and teachers meet together and communicate with voice, video, and digital whiteboard. Live online classes require students and instructors to be online at the same time.




What is blended learning?


Blended learning is an approach that combines the benefits of both face-to-face and online learning components.




What is emergency remote teaching?


Emergency Remote Teaching (ERT) is a temporary shift of instructional delivery; It involves the use of fully remote teaching solutions for instruction or education that would otherwise be delivered face-to-face and that will return to that format once the crisis or emergency has abated. The primary objective in these circumstances is not to re-create a robust educational ecosystem but rather to provide temporary access to instruction and instructional supports in a manner that is quick to set up and is reliably available during an emergency or crisis. A clear and recent example is the worldwide shift to ERT during the COVID-19 crisis. When we understand ERT in this manner, we can start to divorce it from "online learning." There are many examples of countries responding to school and university closures in a time of crisis by implementing models such as mobile learning, radio, or blended learning.. At bina we provide online and blended learning.




What is adaptive learning?


bina courses incorporate a technique called Adaptive Learning. Adaptive learning is a way of carefully tailoring courses toward smaller groups or even individual learners. Usually, this results in several learning trajectories within an educational program, such as various tracks. Relevant characteristics may be things like individual educational goals, knowledge levels, or time available. In the case of online learning, the learner can be tested on these characteristics upon which certain online learning elements are shown—or not shown.
With adaptive learning, the benefits for learners are clear right away. Adaptive learning is used to guide learners through the subject matter much faster than traditional static techniques. Only content that fits the learners' needs will be provided- all the meat and none of the fat. The learners can skip irrelevant or previously-learned content; students in an adaptive learning environment certainly don’t sit around feeling bored in the back of the classroom!




Have you published books and spoken at conferences on education?


Publication: Hall. J. J. (2017). "There’s a consultant for that: When school districts are doing too much, but can’t help themselves". Kappan 99(4), 60-65. Hall, J. J. (2016). Implementing interventions. In Mintrop, H. "Design-based school improvement: A practical guide for education leaders (pp. 203-218)". Cambridge, MA: Harvard Education Press. Hall, J. J. (2016). Deriving design principles. In Mintrop, H. Design-based school improvement: A practical guide for education leaders (pp. 219-236). Cambridge, MA: Harvard Education Press. Conferences: Hall, J. J. & Gabbadon, A. (2019). Unpacking bias: School leaders' perceptions of professional growth in an equity-focused early career leadership development series. Paper presented at the School District of Philadelphia Research to Practice Conference, Philadelphia, PA. Hall, J. J. (2018). Too much of a good thing? Consultants’ contribution to “initiative overload” in Ferguson, MO. Paper presented at the American Educational Research Association Annual Conference, New York, NY. Hall, J. J. & Lemon-Tate, C. (2017). Equity meets accountability in Ferguson: The role of consultants in perpetuating and interrupting the status quo. Paper presented at the University Council for Educational Administration Annual Conference, Denver, CO. Hall, J. J., Crow, R., Perry, J. A., Mintrop, R., & Zambo, D. (2017). Design-based problem-solving, improvement science, and the quest for social justice: A proposal for a signature pedagogy in the educational leadership doctorate. Paper presented at the University Council for Educational Administration Annual Conference, Denver, CO. JOHN J. HALL Hall, J. J. & Lemon-Tate, C. (2017). Witnesses to the quest for equity in Ferguson, MO: Navigating the researcher – practitioner landscape. Paper presented at the New DEEL Annual Conference, Philadelphia, PA. Hall, J. J. (2017). District perspectives on principal professional development. Paper presented at the American Educational Research Association Annual Conference, San Antonio, TX. Hall, J. J., Holme, J. J., Diem, S., Thompson, T., Galindo, R. (2017). Policy and politics in district responses to demographic change. Panel presented at the American Educational Research Association Annual Conference, San Antonio, TX. Hall, J. J., Cosner, S. A., & Eddy Spicer, D. H. (2016). Developing a design-based school improvement mindset in system- level leaders: EdD programs’ intersection with system exigencies. Panel presented at the University Council for Educational Administration Annual Conference, Detroit, MI. Hall, J. J. & Mintrop, R. (2016). An examination of design-based school improvement as the signature pedagogy in an EdD program. Paper presented at the American Educational Research Association Annual Conference, Washington, DC. Hall, J. J., Crow, R., Perry, J. A., Mintrop, R., Kean, B., & Zambo, D. (2015). Action-oriented design research in doctoral programs: Developing the leaders our school systems need. Paper presented at the University Council for Educational Administration Annual Conference, San Diego, CA. Hall, J. J. (2015). The design and implementation of professional development for principals. Paper presented at the International School Leadership Symposium, Zug, Switzerland. Hall, J. J. (2014). Influences on one district's approach to professional development for high school principals. Paper presented at the University Council for Educational Administration Annual Conference, Washington, DC. Hall, J. J. (2014). Influences on a district's design of professional development institutes for principals. Paper presented at the American Educational Research Association Annual Conference, Philadelphia, PA. Hall, J. J. (2013). Influences on district designs for the professional development of new principals. Paper presented at the University Council for Educational Administration Annual Conference, Indianapolis, IN. Hall, J. J. (2013). Influences on district designs for principal professional development. Paper presented at the American Educational Research Association Annual Conference, San Francisco, CA. Hall, J. J. (2012). School district policies for principal professional development: Influences on policy design. Paper presented at the University Council for Educational Administration Annual Conference, Denver, CO. Hall, J. J. (2011). Developing principles for developing principals: One district's process for designing leadership development policies. Paper presented at the University Council for Educational Administration Annual Conference, Pittsburgh, PA. Hall, J. J. (2011). District approaches to the development of school leaders. Paper presented at the Clark Seminar, American Educational Research Association Annual Conference, New Orleans, LA. Hall, J. J. (2010). Leadership learning through collaborative team meetings. Paper presented at the American Educational Research Association Annual Conference, Denver, CO. JOHN J. HALL Hall, J. J. (2009). Opportunities for the collaborative development of district central office administrators. Paper presented at the International School Leadership Symposium, Zug, Switzerland.




Can I read the full bio of Dr. John Hall?


Dr. John Hall is an Assistant Professor of Policy, Organizational, and Leadership Studies in the College of Education at Temple University. Dr. Hall studies the relationships among school systems, school leaders, and the broader social, cultural, and political environment. His current studies focus on three areas: leadership pipeline development in districts and charter management organizations; the germination and evolution of district–university–community partnerships; and the integration of design-based approaches into leadership preparation and development. His recent publications include, with Rick Mintrop, Design-based school improvement: A practical guide for education leaders. Before coming to Temple, Dr. Hall coordinated the doctoral program in Leadership for Educational Equity at UC Berkeley. He also led the Oakland Unified School District’s academic redesign team, providing support and guidance to the district’s leadership, framing policy conversations, and serving as a "boundary spanner" between research and practice. Prior to that, he helped launch a charter school network in the San Francisco Bay Area and founded a support organization for charter leaders across the region. Dr. Hall has been a teacher and an administrator in district schools, charter schools, independent schools, and international schools. He is a founding member of American Education Reaches Out, an international consortium that develops and supports standard-based instruction in schools around the world. Dr. Hall began his career as a research scientist, managing neuroscience laboratories at the University of Washington and at UC San Francisco. Dr. Hall received a BS in Biology and BA in Education from the University of Washington and an MEd and PhD in Education Policy from UC Berkeley.




What is your experience in other schools?


- Dr. Hall has been a teacher and an administrator in district schools, charter schools, independent schools, and international schools in the USA. He is a founding member of American Education Reaches Out, an international consortium that develops and supports standard-based instruction in schools around the world. See his full bio for more details. - Imani Jackson, Master Teacher Prior to coming to Bina, Imani taught second grade at Greene Street Friends School and kindergarten French immersion for 14 years in Maryland. She is a National Board Certified teacher and she is looking forward to moving on to this new branch of her teaching career. Imani obtained her bachelor’s in early childhood education and French from Hood College in Frederick, Maryland as well as her master’s in educational leadership. After teaching for a year in Bourges, France, Imani started her career at Oakland Terrace Elementary School in Silver Spring, Maryland. After a year she transitioned to teaching French immersion at Maryvale Elementary School in Rockville, Maryland. There she found her educational family and stayed for 14 years. Imani loves to learn and is passionate about encouraging a love of learning in her students.




What is your child safety policy?


Our US-based teachers are established, vetted primary school teachers, and therefore have passed thorough background checks via both the FBI and the Department of Justice. Teachers are expressly forbidden to take photos or screenshots during live lessons. Additionally, teachers are prohibited from using mobile phones to take photos or go on social networking sites during lessons.

We also ensure proper practice when our teachers are using the internet including social networking sites such as Facebook and Twitter. This is to protect students, parents and other bina teachers.

The guidelines include but are not limited to:

• Teachers must not publicly mention any of the children from bina on

their online profiles.

• Teachers must not publicly write anything negative or inappropriate about other bina staff members on their social networking sites.

• Teachers should consider the reputation of bina and its children when posting a

status.





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